Category: Latest moWoza News

moWoza wins ETA prize

Image for moWoza wins ETA prize

moWoza wins ETA Prize (funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) for our work in developing an innovative mobile payment solution. Read more here

moWoza highlighted in Vanity Fair, July 2014

Image for moWoza highlighted in Vanity Fair, July 2014

Honored to be included in a Vanity Fair Spotlight on Harambe Entrepreneurs, ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Congratulations to Ms. Rapelang Rabana, Ms. Rumbi Mushavi, Ms. Rakhee Shah, Mr. Idris Ayo Bello, Mr. Sam Imende, Mr. David Ly and all […]

UN awards innovative green prizes: moWoza

Image for UN awards innovative green prizes:  moWoza

moWoza attended the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) at the Green Economy Symposium in Nairobi, Kenya – See more here

2013 Meffys Winner: Innovation in a Growth Market

Image for 2013 Meffys Winner:  Innovation in a Growth Market

Ashish Aggarwal attended Meffys 2013 in San Fransisco. More about the event and prize here

moWoza: an Echoing Green Finalist (2013)

Image for moWoza:  an Echoing Green Finalist (2013)

moWoza: an Echoing Green 2013 Finalist. Read more here

moWoza selected as a 2013 Masschallenge finalist

moWoza – a Masschallenge Finalist. Read more here

Intra-African trade

Image for Intra-African trade

The creation of a free-trade area that boosts Intra-African trade is being proposed by both the African Union and the World Bank as a key driver for economic growth on the African continent. The World Bank reports that African nations are losing out on billions of dollars of potential trade earnings because of trade barriers among neighbouring countries and onerous shortcomings rooted in the continent’s history. However, cross-border trade on a micro and informal level has been taking place for decades. It sustains many livelihoods, creates millions of informal jobs and provides an access point to cheaper and essential goods.

A Barrier That Sparked moWoza

Image for A Barrier That Sparked moWoza

Namiranga – The heaps of groundnuts, rapoko, millet and maize displayed for sale by the side of the Rovuma River in Namiranga are evidence of the fertility of Africa’s soil.
But people in this small town on the Mozambique-Tanzania border struggle to pay for food. The area has been affected by droughts, believed to be worsening as a result of climate change, for the past four years. Namiranga, 3,700 km (2,300 miles) from Mozambique’s capital, Maputo, is largely cut off from basic services and supplies.
Here a 50 kg bag of maize sells for $60. Yet just 20 km (12 miles) away on the Tanzanian side of the border, the same quantity of maize costs only about $46.

Diasporians supporting e-commerce in Africa

Image for Diasporians supporting e-commerce in Africa

I’ve often wondered why Amazon did not take the big leap into Africa. Conversations with locals across the continent and in the Diaspora always end up in a ‘logistics’ debate. How does one ensure that goods get from one city […]

Africa Does Things It’s Own Way

Image for Africa Does Things It’s Own Way

Walk into any African supermarket:   What’s going to strike you, if you’re used to shopping in any ‘developed’ country, is   the narrow range of choice per item. Want washing powder?  Buy Omo.  And no choice of powder, tablets, plastic sachets […]